I’m at the IEEE Software Experts Summit, on May 30, 2014 in Bangalore. The early-bird deadline is coming up very soon!

IEEE Software extends a warm invitation to you to participate in the IEEE Software Experts Summit, on May 30, 2014 at Hotel Radha Regent, Electronic City, Bangalore.< This is a one-day conference geared towards software practitioners and is being held in India for the first time.

A promotional video for the event can be found at http://youtu.be/HTjhLVZwJqo

The conference will feature talks from well-known thought leaders including Grady Booch, Gerd Hoefner, Jan Bosch, Michiel van Genuchten, and Thomas Zimmermann who will be talking about different aspects of modern software development under the theme umbrella “Software Engineering for the 21st Century”. For further information about the agenda and speakers, please visit http://www.computer.org/portal/web/computingnow/ses14

To register for this conference, please use the “Registration, Fee & Hotel Info” link on the above link. Please note that the early bird registration cost is $35 and ends on April 30th. Since, the seating capacity for the conference is limited to 400 people, please register soon so you don’t miss out on this wonderful opportunity to listen to and network with the luminaries of the field.

Please also kindly forward this email and the news of this conference to your friends and colleagues, so that they can also avail of this wonderful opportunity.

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Please consider submitting to the 29th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering (ASE 2014) in Vasteras, Sweden. I am on the external review panel of the research track. Please submit your papers by April 25 (abstracts: April 18). The conference will be held September 15-19, 2014.

The IEEE/ACM Automated Software Engineering (ASE) Conference series is the premier research forum for automated software engineering. Each year, it brings together researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to discuss foundations, techniques and tools for automating the analysis, design, implementation, testing, and maintenance of large software systems.

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Cowboys, Ankle Sprains, and Keepers of Quality

Video games make up an important part of the software industry, yet the software engineering community rarely studies video games. This imbalance is a problem if video game development differs from general software development, as some game experts suggest. In this paper we describe a study with 14 interviewees and 362 survey respondents. The study elicited substantial differences between video game development and other software development. For example, in game development, “cowboy coders” are necessary to cope with the continuous interplay between creative desires and technical constraints. Consequently, game developers are hesitant to use automated testing because of these tests’ rapid obsolescence in the face of shifting creative desires of game designers. These differences between game and non-game development have implications for research, industry, and practice. For instance, as a starting point for impacting game development, researchers could create testing tools that enable game developers to create tests that assert flexible behavior with little up-front investment.

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This paper describes patterns of skill progression in Forza Motorsports 4, an Xbox 360 racing game. Using in-game telemetry data from more than 200,000 players and 24 million races, we characterize how players use and customize driving assists such as the trajectory line, automatic gear shifting, or assisted braking over time. We find that some of the assists are never disabled by significant player segments. Some “yoyo” players repeatedly enable and disable assists. We also present a model to predict when a player is ready to successfully disable an assist with a precision ranging from 60 to 90 percent.

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In this paper, we present the results from two surveys related to data science applied to software engineering. The first survey solicited questions that software engineers would like to ask data scientists to investigate about software, software processes and practices, and about software engineers. Our analysis resulted in a list of 145 questions grouped into 12 categories. The second survey asked a different pool of software engineers to rate the 145 questions and identify the most important ones to work on first. Respondents favored questions that focus on how customers typically use their applications. We also see opposition to questions that assess the performance of individual employees or compare them to one another. Our categorization and catalog of 145 questions will help researchers, practitioners, and educators to more easily focus their efforts on topics that are important to the software industry.

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Build, creating software from source code, is a fundamental activity in software development. Build teams manage this process and ensure builds are produced reliably and efficiently. This paper presents an exploration into the nature of build teams—how they form, work, and relate to other teams—through three multi-method studies conducted at Microsoft. We also consider build team effectiveness and find that many challenges are social, not technical: role ambiguity, knowledge sharing, communication, trust, and conflict. Our findings validate theories from group dynamics and organization science, and using a cross-discipline approach, we apply learnings from these fields to inform the design of engineering tools and practices to improve build team effectiveness

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Please consider submitting to the International Workshop on Software Engineering Research and Industrial Practices, which will be co-located with the ICSE 2014 conference in Hyderabad, India. I will be giving the keynote . Please submit your papers by January 24, 2014.

The aim of this workshop is to bring together researchers and practitioners to discuss current state of Software Engineering (SE) research and Industrial Practices (IPs), and advance collaboration to reduce gap between research and practice. Research is core part of modern business which can lead to innovation in the form of new products and improvements in existing products and services. Most companies involved in IT solutions and services are facing challenges to incorporate research output into practices. Therefore, the challenges are to identify the gaps and to discover ways in collaboration to use SE research for the benefit of IPs.

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