Please submit to the 12th Working Conference on Mining Software Repositories (MSR 2015), co-located with ICSE 2015 on Florence, Italy. The submission deadline is February 13, 2015 (abstracts February 6; as always, please check the webpage for any extensions). I’m a member of the Program Committee for the technical research track.

Software repositories such as source control systems, archived communications between project personnel, and defect tracking systems are used to help manage the progress of software projects. Software practitioners and researchers are recognizing the benefits of mining this information to support the maintenance of software systems, improve software design/reuse, and empirically validate novel ideas and techniques. Research is now proceeding to uncover the ways in which mining these repositories can help to understand software development and software evolution, to support predictions about software development, and to exploit this knowledge in planning future development. The goal of this two-day working conference is to advance the science and practice of software engineering via the analysis of data stored in software repositories.

This year, we will solicit three tracks of papers: research, practice, and data. As in previous MSR editions, there will be a Mining Challenge and a special issue of best MSR papers in the Empirical Software Engineering journal.

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Please submit to the 23rd IEEE International Conference on Program Comprehension (ICPC 2015), co-located with ICSE 2015 on Florence, Italy. The submission deadline is January 26, 2015 (abstracts: January 19; as always, please check the webpages for any extensions). I’m a member of the Program Committee for the technical research track.

The IEEE International Conference on Program Comprehension (ICPC) is the principal venue for works in the area of program comprehension, and it promises to provide a quality forum for researchers and practitioners from academia, industry, and government to present and to discuss state-of-the-art results and best practices in the field of program comprehension.

Program reading and comprehension (or understanding) is a vital software engineering and maintenance activity, such as software reuse, inspection, maintenance, reverse engineering, reengineering, migration, and extension of existing software systems.

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I presented the following slides as an invited talk at the SIGSOFT FSE 2014 conference.

https://speakerdeck.com/tomzimmermann/data-hard-with-a-vengeance

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I presented the following slides at the CHI Play 2014 conference. The initial slides were created by Gifford Cheung.

https://speakerdeck.com/tomzimmermann/the-first-hour-experience-how-the-initial-play-can-engage-or-lose-new-players

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I presented the following slides at the Next Generation of Mining Software Repositories (a pre-FSE 2014 Event).

https://speakerdeck.com/tomzimmermann/insight-2-dot-0-beyond-the-repository

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Here are the slides for a short talk that I gave at MSR 2014 about the MSR 2004 paper Preprocessing CVS Data for Fine-Grained Analysis, which won the Ten Year Most Influential Paper Award.

https://speakerdeck.com/tomzimmermann/preprocessing-cvs-data-for-fine-grained-analysis-ten-years-later

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Luciano Baresi, Tim Menzies, Andreas Metzger, and I are co-organizing the First International Workshop on BIG Data Software Engineering (BIGDSE 2015), co-located with ICSE 2015 on Florence, Italy. We invite authors to submit any of the two kinds of workshop papers: Full papers with 7 pages maximum or Position papers with 4 pages maximum. The submission deadline is January 23, 2015.

Software engineering as a research discipline has been challenged, since its inception, with collecting and analyzing empirical evidence – be it about people, processes or artifacts – to develop principles, models and theories. In recent years we have seen strong interest and efforts devoted to evidence-based approaches to theory building. We are now at a crossroads where we have available an unprecedented amount of data that is available in real-time and from a multitude of sources. Complementing this trend in data availability is the emergence of novel and improved analytics algorithms and tools (such as deep learning) that allows us to distil actionable insights for software adaptation, evolution and quality. For software engineering, similar to other disciplines in science and economics, the aforementioned developments may lead to radical new ways and unprecedented opportunities of attacking problems. Big Data software systems (aka. data-intensive software systems), represent an emerging class of software systems that challenges existing software engineering principles, methods and tools due to the sheer size and real-time processing of data. The impact that the aforementioned kinds of opportunities and challenges will have on software engineering are of relevance to the BIGDSE’15 workshop.

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