How Practitioners Perceive the Relevance of ESEM Research – ESEM 2016

Background: The relevance of ESEM research to industry practitioners is key to the long-term health of the conference. Aims: The goal of this work is to understand how ESEM research is perceived within the practitioner community and provide feedback to the ESEM community ensure our research remains relevant. Method: To understand how practitioners perceive ESEM research, we replicated previous work by sending a survey to several hundred industry practitioners at a number of companies around the world. We asked the survey participants to rate the relevance of the research described in 156 ESEM papers published between 2011 and 2015. Results: We received 9,941 ratings by 437 practitioners who labeled ideas as Essential, Worthwhile, Unimportant, or Unwise. The results showed that overall, industrial practitioners find the work published in ESEM to be valuable: 67% of all ratings were essential or worthwhile. We found no correlation between citation count and perceived relevance of the papers. Through a qualitative analysis, we also identified a number of research themes on which practitioners would like to see an increased research focus. Conclusions: The work published in ESEM is generally relevant to industrial practitioners. There are a number of topics for which those practitioners would like to see additional research undertaken.

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SCAM 2016: International Working Conference on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation – Raleigh, NC, USA

Please submit to the 16th IEEE International Working Conference on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM 2016). The submission deadline is June 24, 2016 (abstracts June 20) — as always, please check the webpage for any extensions. I’m a member of the Program Committee for the research track.

The 16th IEEE International Working Conference on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM 2016) aims to bring together researchers and practitioners working on theory, techniques, and applications that concern analysis and/or manipulation of the source code of software systems. The term “source code” refers to any fully executable description of a software system, such as machine code, (very) high-level languages, and executable graphical representations of systems. The term “analysis” refers to any (semi-)automated procedure that yields insight into source code, while “manipulation” refers to any automated or semi-automated procedure that takes and returns source code. While much attention in the wider software engineering community is directed towards other aspects of systems development and evolution, such as specification, design, and requirements engineering, it is the source code that contains the only precise description of the behavior of a system. Hence, the analysis and manipulation of source code remains a pressing concern for which SCAM 2016 solicits high quality paper submissions.

ASE 2016: International Conference on Automated Software Engineering – Singapore

Please submit to the 31st IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering (ASE 2016). The submission deadline is April 29, 2016 (abstracts April 22) — as always, please check the webpage for any extensions. I’m a member of the Program Committee for the research track.

The IEEE/ACM Automated Software Engineering (ASE) Conference series is the premier research forum for automated software engineering. Each year, it brings together researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to discuss foundations, techniques, and tools for automating the analysis, design, implementation, testing, and maintenance of large software systems. ASE 2016 invites high quality contributions describing significant, original, and unpublished results.

ICSME 2016: International Conference on Software Maintenance and Evolution – Raleigh, NC, USA

Please submit to the 32nd International Conference on Software Maintenance and Evolution (ICSME 2016) in Raleigh, NC, USA. The submission deadline is April 8, 2016 (abstracts April 1) — as always, please check the webpage for any extensions. I’m a member of the Program Committee for the research track.

The International Conference on Software Maintenance and Evolution (ICSME) is the premier international forum for researchers and practitioners from academia, industry, and government to present, discuss, and debate the most recent ideas, experiences, and challenges in software maintenance and evolution.

ICSME 2016, the 32nd in the conference series, will be held in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. Known as the City of Oaks for its many oak trees, Raleigh is the capital of the state of North Carolina and part of the famous Research Triangle, which is a major center for high-tech and biotech research. Raleigh’s historic landmarks and cosmopolitan offerings, from prominent public museums to a diverse culinary scene, make it a one-of-a-kind cultural and entertainment center of the Southeastern US.

Beliefs, Practices, and Personalities of Software Engineers: A Survey in a Large Software Company – CHASE 2016

In this paper we present the results from a survey about the beliefs, practices, and personalities of software engineers in a large software company. The survey received 797 responses. We report statistics about beliefs of software engineers, their work practices, as well as differences in those with respect to personality traits. For example, we observed no personality differences between developers and testers; managers were conscientious and more extraverted. We observed several differences for engineers who are listening to music and for engineers who have built a tool. We also observed that engineers who agree with the statement “Agile development is awesome” were more extroverted and less neurotic.p>

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FSE 2016: International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering – Seattle, WA, USA

Please submit to the 24th ACM SIGSOFT International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE 2016). The conference will be held in Seattle, WA, USA between November 13 and November 19, 2016. I’m the General Chair of the conference. There are many ways for you to participate in FSE: research papers, workshop proposals, vision and reflections papers, industry papers, demo papers, doctoral symposium, and the student research competition. Please check the full list of call for contributions.

The first deadlines are approaching:

So What’s new with FSE 2016?

  • The Research track will include Author rebuttal.
  • The conference will include a strong focus on practice: The Showcase Track and the Industry Track will highlight and solicit state-of-the-practice, best practices, as well as exemplary applied research in software engineering
  • The Demo track is now accepting data sets in addition to tool demos.
  • The new Visions and Reflections track will feature radical new directions that represent disruptive innovations in the making as well as startling results and bold arguments on current research directions.
  • We will focus on a unique conference experience: The new Mentorship program will connect you more efficiently with other attendees. Other initiatives to improve the conference experience will be announced soon.
  • The Artifacts stream will collect and catalog reusable artifacts.

A special thanks to our corporate supporters: Microsoft, Tata Consultancy Services, Accenture, Google, Huawei, and Infosys. If you are interested in supporting FSE, please contact me.

“What Went Right and What Went Wrong”: An Analysis of 155 Postmortems from Game Development – ICSE 2016 SEIP Track

In game development, software teams often conduct postmortems to reflect on what went well and what went wrong in a project. The postmortems are shared publicly on gaming sites or at developer conferences. In this paper, we present an analysis of 155 postmortems published on the gaming site Gamasutra.com. We identify characteristics of game development, link the characteristics to positive and negative experiences in the postmortems and distill a set of best practices and pitfalls for game development.

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